Launched in 2018, the not-for-profit organization OceanMind is using AI for good to help solve global environmental and human rights challenges.

Explore OceanMind’s story
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AI in action

AI is empowering people across OceanMind’s organization—no matter their technical expertise. “I was a commercial fisher, fisheries observer, and fisheries researcher,” says Natalie Tellwright, Senior Fisheries Analyst at OceanMind. “My background is not in tech.” Working closely with engineers, fisheries experts are developing new alerting systems while collaborating with their partners in the field to test them. In putting their AI solutions into action, they’re able to accelerate their efforts and free up time to innovate in new areas.

The value AI is bringing to OceanMind includes:

Expanded capacity

Deeper insights

Improved accuracy

Increased societal impact

Partnering to preserve ocean health

Processing large quantities of data isn’t the key to how OceanMind is keeping oceans healthy. The key is putting that data into the hands of people who can act on it. That’s the philosophy behind OceanMind’s AI partnerships with local agencies. OceanMind is also partnering with Microsoft in its push for accountability on the water, using Microsoft AI and cloud capabilities to empower governments, suppliers, and non-governmental organizations at scale around the world. Together, they’re making an impact.

A discussion on how people and partnerships can lead to AI success, with:

Nick Wise CEO, OceanMind
Nick Wise
CEO, OceanMind
Natalie Tellwright Senior Fisheries Analyst, OceanMind
Natalie Tellwright
Senior Fisheries Analyst, OceanMind
Kanit Naksung Director of Fish Quarantine and Fishing Vessels Inspection Division Thailand Department of Fisheries
Kanit Naksung
Director of Fish Quarantine and Fishing Vessels Inspection Division
Thailand Department of Fisheries

Partnering to protect fish populations

OceanMind works closely with fisheries and labor enforcement agencies in individual countries, providing AI tools that help make their efforts more successful. Government officials on the ground are experts in local regulations and enforcement capabilities, so their input in training the AI is critical to success. “We can use AI to help enforce fisheries law and to help authorities make better decisions,” says Kanit Naksung, Director of Fish Quarantine and Fishing Vessels Inspection Division, Thailand Department of Fisheries. “Any vessels that violated fishing laws or regulation are detected and can be acted on accordingly.” AI augments fisheries and labor enforcement departments with limited staff, allowing them to do more with less.

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Learning from OceanMind

OceanMind is partnering with enforcement agencies and the private sector to preserve the health of the world’s oceans with AI.

How can AI help your organization make a difference?

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